Thursday, September 11, 2014

New Favorite - Hay Nets

With in the last year I've become a hay net user. I used to own one with big holes and rarely (if ever) used it. Last year as we were heading towards Spring, Emi and Roz were wasting a lot of hay. Of course once you spread it all around, walk on it, and poop on it, you can't eat it anymore! Not only was I not thrilled with them wasting it, I didn't like them standing around with out anything to eat. I decided to purchase one small hole hay net to give it a try. I purchased this one in trailer size. I started using it and found that Roz and Emi seemed to prefer it over hay on the ground.

 I was a bit worried that one of them would find a way to get hung up in it...but that hasn't happened yet. The holes are small enough that a hoof couldn't get through, and that was my biggest fear. Next I ordered a small hole net from smartpak.  I then purchased another hay net like the first, but in the larger size. The two larger nets are what I'm still using, but the smaller trailer sized one is perfect for a day at a horse show. Both open wide and are relatively easy to load. I love that the hay nets reduce waste, and keep the horses eating longer.  I also love knowing that they have something to snack on all day long.

So...do you love hay nets or hate them? How many of you use them?



16 comments:

  1. Can't believe how big she is getting! Side by side with roz it's really apparent. :)

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  2. Love hay nets! Just be sure you tie it up as tight as possible because they droop the emptier they get.

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  3. i bought my first ever hay net this spring for my trailer. chose it mostly bc it was purple. but.... it's got pretty big holes and there's a lot of wastage. so i'm looking into other alternatives. a smaller holed bag, or maybe even one of those canvas sacks with one mouth hole in them?

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    1. Yeah...I think the small holes work well!

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    2. Emma, don't get the canvas ones. I hated mine!!! They would pull all of the hay out of it... Also my horse and donkey destroyed it but it wasn't in the trailer so that might not be an issue for you.

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  4. A couple of winters ago when I was keeping my ponies in the back yard I purchased four of these. I filled all of them and hung two at a time so that I didn't have to fill every time. I really liked them and feel like it gave them something to do rather than just gulping down their good. Now I board but when I eventually move Katai home again I plan on using these

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  5. I haven't tried the small-hole nets, but have a couple of the bags with nylon sides and backs and a grid front. With a rigid top opening they are easy to fill with a fat flake, but the nets you have would be better for a bigger feeding.

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    1. The rigid sides do make them a bit easier to fill. As it is these nets are not bad at all!

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  6. I have two gutsbusta full bale haynets with tiny tiny holes. My mare always has hay in them (as there is no grass) so in know she always has something to eat. She's barefoot so I leave the net as close to the ground as possible because there is no chance of her getting caught and I prefer her to eat off the ground to help drain her airways of bacteria (like nature intended). I had to do an essay on travel sickness for uni and found out the leafing cause is long periods without putting the head down low to eat because the bacteria that is normal in the upper respiratory tract dribble down into the lower and cause lung infections. Eeek!!

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    1. That's gross! Thankfully my two do a mix of both. They are fed in the pasture in the morning on the ground and then in hay nets at night when they are in. Plus, they end up losing hay on the ground and then eating off of there after pulling it out of the nets.

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  7. I see positives and negatives with them. Positives are less waste and slower hay consumption. Negatives are that they can be difficult to load (drove me crazy as a barn worker with 17 of the dang things), that they force eating at a weird neck angle for the horse, and that they are at an angle that increases dust intake into their respiratory system. I think it's a to-each-his-own type thing.

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    1. "To-each-his-own," that's always the way it is with horse people. :)

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  8. I love mine, the greedy welsh cob not so much :) I just hang them low to avoid the airway and salivary issues involved with high feeding.

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